Medium.com: Generating Code Coverage with PHPUnit and phpdbg

In this post on his Medium page Elton Minetto shows how to generate the code coverage of your PHPunit tests with better performance using phpdbg.

In a previous post (in portuguese) I explained how to identify tests that are taking too long to execute. In this post, I’ll show you how to increase the performance of code coverage report generation using PHPUnit.

In the phpunit.xml file it’s possible to add configurations to generate reports related to the tests that are being executed. […] In addition to changing the phpunit.xml file, to generate this information we also need to install the extension XDebug. However, by installing it we get a substantial decrease in performance.

He shows an example of the time difference in running the tests (about 1 minute without versus 22 with XDebug). He went looking for a better way and found this post talking about using phpdbg instead. He includes the "brew" commands to get everything you’ll need installed and how to use phpdbg with your coverage calls rather than XDebug. However, as is pointed out at the end of the post, the results are slightly different but they’re close enough to help you know what code to target next.

PHPDeveloper.org

IBM Developer Blog: Get Started With CouchDB Using PHP and Guzzle

On the IBM Developer Blog they’ve posted a new article from Lorna Mitchell helping you get started with CouchDB and Guzzle, making use of this popular HTTP client package to interface with CouchDB’s HTTP interface quickly and easily.

In today’s post, we’ll look at how we can use CouchDB in our PHP applications, using the excellent PHP HTTP library Guzzle. Guzzle is a modern, PSR-7 compliant object-oriented PHP library that handles all aspects of HTTP in a correct and — importantly, a scalable — way. So it’s a great way to add any HTTP-interfaced services into your application (PHP 5.5 and later, does support PHP 7).

She then starts off with the installation of Guzzle via Composer and some sample code to make the initial connection to the CouchDB server (either local or remote). With the connection up and working and a "welcome" banner returned, she shows some simple operations like:

  • getting a list of all databases
  • creating a new database
  • inserting and selecting data
  • updating and deleting data

Code is provided for each of these and, thankfully, Guzzle makes it a pretty simple process and handles most of the heavy lifting on the HTTP requests for you.

PHPDeveloper.org

TutsPlus.com: How to Program With Yii2: Uploading Files

On the TutsPlus.com site there’s a new installment in their "How to Program With Yii2 Series" looking at implementing file uploads with some simple examples.

In this How to Program With Yii2 series, I’m guiding readers in use of the Yii2 Framework for PHP. In this tutorial, I’ll guide you through the basics of uploading files and images in Yii2.

For these examples, we’ll continue to imagine we’re building a framework for posting simple status updates, e.g. our own mini-Twitter. The image above demonstrates writing a short update while uploading a picture I took of the Taj Mahal.

They start with a look at some of the file upload plugins that seemed like the best they found to use with Yii2: FileInput and the 2Amigos BlueImp File Uploader. They go with the first option for the rest of the tutorial, showing you how to get it installed (via Composer), updating your current database tables and changing the model to reflect these updates. Next they help you create the view with the image upload form and one to display the image result once the upload is successful (including the controller code needed).

PHPDeveloper.org

TutsPlus.com: Using PHP CodeSniffer With WordPress: Installing and Using PHP CodeSniffer

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series showing the use of the PHP CodeSniffer tool with WordPress. In the first part of the series they introduced "code smells" and build on that in part two with the installation and use of PHP CodeSniffer to detect these smells.

In the first article of this series, we defined code smells and looked at a few examples of what they are and how we may refactor them so the quality of the code is improved.

[…] Ultimately, we’re working towards implementing WordPress-specific code sniffing rules, but before we do that it’s important to familiarize yourself with PHP CodeSniffer. In this article, we’re going to take a look at what PHP CodeSniffer is, how to install it, how to run it against an example script, and how to refactor said script. Then we’ll look at how we’re going to move forward into WordPress-specific code.

The tutorial then shows you how to get the tool installed using Composer, not the PEAR method. They help you install Composer then create the simple project with a composer.json configuration file defining the dependency. They provide a sample bit of code to run the analysis against and an example of the output showing violations of the coding standard.

PHPDeveloper.org

SitePoint PHP Blog: Nitpicking over Code Standards with Nitpick CI

On the SitePoint PHP blog there’s a new tutorial posted from Bruno Skvorc showing you how to use Nitpick CI to "nitpick" over coding standards and rules in your PHP code.

There are many ways to make sure your code respects a given code standard – we’ve covered several before. But enforcing a standard team-wide and making sure everyone knows about mistakes before they’re applied to the project isn’t something that’s very easy to do. Travis and Jenkins can both be configured to do these checks, but aren’t as easygoing about it as the solution we’re about to look at: Nitpick CI.

He starts by getting a sample project bootstrapped and pushes it up to GitHub so the Nitpick service can access it. He then switches over to the Nitpick side and shows the setup of an account and a new project pointing to the newly created repo. He then includes the process and results of two kinds of pushes: non-code (README update) and both a valid/invalid code update. He shows examples of the comments the Nitpick service makes directly on the code and a patch to fix the issues.

PHPDeveloper.org

Toptal.com: Jumpstart Your PHP Testing with Codeception

The Toptal.com blog has posted a new tutorial that wants to help you make the most of your application via testing. They show you how to use Codeception to create a set of tests to ensure your application is working as expected.

Before moving on to Codeception and PHP, we should cover the basics and start by explaining why we need testing in applications in the first place. Perhaps we could complete a project without wasting time on tests, at least this time?

Sure, you don’t need tests for everything; for example, when you want to build yet another homepage. […] However, you definitely do need testing when: your team uses BDD/TDD, your Git repo contains more than a couple commits, [and] you are a proper professional, working on a serious project.

They start with a look at the kinds of things testing solves in your development process and the different kinds of tests you can create. From there they introduce Codeception, an alternative testing tool to the widely used PHPUnit. The tutorial helps you get it installed and shows you how to make a simple, first test. It helps you execute the test, debug issues that might pop up and the different assertions you can use. With the fundamentals in place, they move on to more details on using it for functional and unit testing.

PHPDeveloper.org

Scotch.io: Prototype Quickly in Laravel with PHP’s Built-In Server and SQLite

The Scotch.io site has a tutorial they’ve posted showing how to prototype a site quickly using Laravel and its built-in server/SQLite support.

If you are a seasoned Laravel developer, you know the usual project setup drill that involves creating a new project, a fresh database, and adding a virtual host entry to Apache.

If you are starting from scratch, the Apache and MySQL installation can take some time and slow things down for you. However, I will show you how you can jump start your Laravel development without Apache and MySQL.

The tutorial shows you how to use the internal PHP server to host the application, run a Laravel site inside it and integrate SQLite as the database. Each section comes with some example code and the commands/configuration you’ll need to make the system work. They also take a "deep dive" into Larvel’s serve command and how it bootstraps the Laravel instance for the PHP built-in server. The post ends with a look at switching back to MySQL and a comparison of SQLite vs MySQL (as well as using SQLite for production).

PHPDeveloper.org

CloudWays Blog: Using Memcached With PHP

On the Cloudways blog they have a new tutorial posted showing you how to use memcached with PHP to help improve the overall performance of your application through cached data.

Memcached is a distributed memory caching system. It speeds up websites having large dynamic databasing by storing database object in Dynamic Memory to reduce the pressure on a server whenever an external data source requests a read. A memcached layer reduces the number of times database requests are made.

[..] Why Memcached? It increases the response time of your web pages, which in return enhances the overall customer’s experience. A better response time allows users to fetch data seamlessly.

He starts by ensuring that you already have a memcached instance up and running (it’s external to PHP). They suggest using their own Cloudways setup, but it’s relatively easy to install with packages on most Linux distributions. With that verified, he shows how to check for memchace functionality in your PHP installation and provides a bit of code to create a connection. Next is an example showing how to pull information from a MySQL database and push that data directly into the waiting memcache server via a set method call. It also includes a get example, showing if the caching was a success or not.

PHPDeveloper.org

SitePoint PHP Blog: Drunk with the Power of Composer Plugins

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial for the Composer users out there talking about Composer plugin development and how they can add functionality to this already powerful tool.

Composer is the sharpest tool in the toolbox of the modern PHP developer. The days of manual dependency management are in the distant past, and in their place we have wonderful things like Semver. Things that help us sleep at night, because we can update our dependencies without smashing rocks together.

[…] Even though we use Composer so frequently, there’s not a lot of shared knowledge about how to extend it. […] Yet, recent changes have made it much easier to develop Composer plugins. […] So, today I thought we would explore the possibilities of Composer plugin development, and create a fresh bit of documentation as we go.

He walks you through the creation of a simple plugin: one that tracks users and the dependencies they require. He shows you how to create the initial plugin boilerplate and the creation of the addDependencies and activate methods. These grab the dependencies being added and send the information off to a remote site.

PHPDeveloper.org

Voices of the ElePHPant: Interview with Christian Wenz

The Voices of the ElePHPant podcast, hosted by PHP community member Cal Evans, has released their latest episode interviewing another member of the PHP community. In this latest episode Cal talks with Christian Wenz

They talk about Christian’s work with the core of the PHP language and its internals and his recommendation to those listening to help support it as well. They also talk about how he first got involved in contributing to the core of the language. Cal and Christian talk about his contributions to the Zend Certification Guide and bootcamp he (Christian) presents at the ZendCon conference to help teach people the information to pass the ZCE exam. They also talk some about their own experiences speaking at conferences.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. If you enjoy the episode either subscribe to their feed or follow them on Twitter.

PHPDeveloper.org