IBM Developer Blog: Get Started With CouchDB Using PHP and Guzzle

On the IBM Developer Blog they’ve posted a new article from Lorna Mitchell helping you get started with CouchDB and Guzzle, making use of this popular HTTP client package to interface with CouchDB’s HTTP interface quickly and easily.

In today’s post, we’ll look at how we can use CouchDB in our PHP applications, using the excellent PHP HTTP library Guzzle. Guzzle is a modern, PSR-7 compliant object-oriented PHP library that handles all aspects of HTTP in a correct and — importantly, a scalable — way. So it’s a great way to add any HTTP-interfaced services into your application (PHP 5.5 and later, does support PHP 7).

She then starts off with the installation of Guzzle via Composer and some sample code to make the initial connection to the CouchDB server (either local or remote). With the connection up and working and a "welcome" banner returned, she shows some simple operations like:

  • getting a list of all databases
  • creating a new database
  • inserting and selecting data
  • updating and deleting data

Code is provided for each of these and, thankfully, Guzzle makes it a pretty simple process and handles most of the heavy lifting on the HTTP requests for you.

PHPDeveloper.org

SitePoint PHP Blog: Using Halite for Privacy and Two-Way Encryption of Emails

On the SitePoint PHP blog there’s a new tutorial posted showing you how to use the Halite package to encrypt the contents of emails. The Halite library sits on top of the libsodium functionality to provide tested, hardened cryptographic results.

Cryptography is a complex matter. In fact, there is one golden rule: „Don’t implement cryptography yourself.“ The reason for this is that so many things can go wrong while implementing it, the slightest error can generate a vulnerability and if you look away, your precious data can be read by someone else.

[…] Some libraries out there implement cryptography primitives and operations, and leave a lot of decisions to the developer. […] Nevertheless, there is one library that stands out from the rest for its simplicity and takes a lot of responsibility from the developer on the best practices, in addition to using the libsodium library. In this article we are going to explore Halite.

The tutorial then starts of helping you get the libsodium package installed on your system (assuming it’s unix-based). They then start on the sample application – a basic "email" client able to send/receive messages between users. They set up RESTful endpoints to get the messages, use the Doctrine ORM for a database interface and show the use of the Halite Crypto class to encrypt/decrypt the message contents.

PHPDeveloper.org

TutsPlus.com: Using PHP CodeSniffer With WordPress: Installing and Using PHP CodeSniffer

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series showing the use of the PHP CodeSniffer tool with WordPress. In the first part of the series they introduced "code smells" and build on that in part two with the installation and use of PHP CodeSniffer to detect these smells.

In the first article of this series, we defined code smells and looked at a few examples of what they are and how we may refactor them so the quality of the code is improved.

[…] Ultimately, we’re working towards implementing WordPress-specific code sniffing rules, but before we do that it’s important to familiarize yourself with PHP CodeSniffer. In this article, we’re going to take a look at what PHP CodeSniffer is, how to install it, how to run it against an example script, and how to refactor said script. Then we’ll look at how we’re going to move forward into WordPress-specific code.

The tutorial then shows you how to get the tool installed using Composer, not the PEAR method. They help you install Composer then create the simple project with a composer.json configuration file defining the dependency. They provide a sample bit of code to run the analysis against and an example of the output showing violations of the coding standard.

PHPDeveloper.org

CloudWays Blog: Using Memcached With PHP

On the Cloudways blog they have a new tutorial posted showing you how to use memcached with PHP to help improve the overall performance of your application through cached data.

Memcached is a distributed memory caching system. It speeds up websites having large dynamic databasing by storing database object in Dynamic Memory to reduce the pressure on a server whenever an external data source requests a read. A memcached layer reduces the number of times database requests are made.

[..] Why Memcached? It increases the response time of your web pages, which in return enhances the overall customer’s experience. A better response time allows users to fetch data seamlessly.

He starts by ensuring that you already have a memcached instance up and running (it’s external to PHP). They suggest using their own Cloudways setup, but it’s relatively easy to install with packages on most Linux distributions. With that verified, he shows how to check for memchace functionality in your PHP installation and provides a bit of code to create a connection. Next is an example showing how to pull information from a MySQL database and push that data directly into the waiting memcache server via a set method call. It also includes a get example, showing if the caching was a success or not.

PHPDeveloper.org

NetTuts.com: WP REST API: Setting Up and Using Basic Authentication

On the NetTuts.com site there’s a tutorial posted showing you how to set up and use basic authentication in the WordPress REST API. This is part two in their series introducing the WordPress REST API.

In the introductory part of this series, we had a quick refresher on REST architecture and how it can help us create better applications. […] In the current part of the series, we will set up a basic authentication protocol on the server to send authenticated requests to perform various tasks through the REST API.

They talk about the methods that are available for authentication and how to configure your server and WordPress instance to use it. From there they show how to make authenticated requests to the API using various tools:

  • Postman
  • a Javascript framework (jQuery)
  • the command line via curl
  • using the WP HTTP API

Example code and screenshots are provided for each (where appropriate) helping to ensure you’re up and working quickly.

PHPDeveloper.org

Andrew Embler: Q&A: Using Composer in a concrete5 Package

Andrew Embler has posted a guide to his site showing you how to use Composer with concrete5 to integrate third party libraries quickly and easily. concrete5 is an open source content management system under the MIT license and is flexible and easy to extend.

Let’s say I’m creating a statistics package and I want to use LavaCharts in it. For those who don’t know, LavaCharts is a PHP library that abstracts Google’s JavaScript Chart API to PHP. Instead of writing JavaScript, you build your charts with object-oriented PHP. It’s nice. LavaCharts is available through Composer, so I’ll include it that way.

He uses this particular package as an example, showing you how to create the composer.json file to include the LavaCharts library and run Composer to install it. He then shows the integration of the package with the concrete5 CMS instance, including the Composer autoloader in the "on start" handling. From there it’s just a matter of referencing the library via its namespace and using it to populate and generate the resulting chart.

PHPDeveloper.org

SitePoint PHP Blog: WP API and OAuth – Using WordPress without WordPress

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial showing you how to „use WordPress without WordPress“ via a basic RESTish API installed via plugin. The article focuses on using the OAuth authentication method to connect a client to the WP instance, linked to a system user via generated tokens.

In this tutorial, we’ll learn how to install and use WP-API with OAuth – a WordPress plugin which uses REST-like API endpoints to allow reading of WP content to unauthenticated users, and writing of WP content to users who authenticate via OAuth (or via Cookies for themes and plugins). Using the plugin isn’t very straightforward, and the prerequisite list is quite long, so this post was written to make it simple and relatively approachable (as long as you’re in control of your own server).

The tutorial walks you through the steps to get a WordPress instance installed (via a git clone) and setting it up to work with Homestead Improved. He then installs the „wp-cli“ tool to get the OAuth1 plugin needed to make things work correctly and how to use it to generate the needed key and secret for the OAuth connection. He then makes a simple script that uses the Guzzle HTTP client and it’s OAuth handling to make the OAuth request for a token, call the callback page and return the bearer token for the remainder of the requests. Finally he creates a simple page that uses this token to submit a new article via the API and views it in the WordPress interface.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/wp-api-and-oauth-using-wordpress-without-wordpress/
PHPDeveloper.org

Hafiz Waheeduddin Ahmad: API Testing: Installing and Using Codeception

Hafiz Waheeduddin Ahmad has a new post to his site, part three of a series he’s posted on API testing, looking at the use of Codeception for testing API output and functionality.

In this post, we will have a look on how we can use Codeception for API testing.

He starts by helping you get Codeception installed through Composer through a „require“ command line call. He then walks you through the setup of the project and how to use the „codecept“ command line tool. He covers the generated directory structure the bootstrapping created and how to set up a sample configuration for your API. He then gets into writing an example test, showing how to check things like authentication, HTTP header information, response codes and response contents. Finally he shows how to run the tests in both a normal and more verbose way.

Link: http://haafiz.me/development/api-testing-installing-and-using-codeception
PHPDeveloper.org

NetTuts.com: Using the Digital Ocean API to Manage Cloud Instances

In a new tutorial on the NetTuts.com site they show you how to use a Digital Ocean PHP SDK to manage your cloud instances from a PHP-based application.

The Digital Ocean API allows you to manage Droplets and resources in a simple, programmatic way using HTTP requests. All of the functionality that you are familiar with in the Digital Ocean control panel is also available through the API, allowing you to script the complex actions that your situation requires. For this tutorial, we’ll integrate developer Antoine Corcy’s Digital Ocean V2 PHP API Library into a Yii-based console application.

They walk you through the full process of the setup – getting your access keys, getting the PHP SDK and setting up a component as an interface for the rest of the Yii2 application to use. From there, he shows three examples of the types of commands to can issue:

  • Fetching Droplets
  • Fetching Images
  • Automating Snapshots

Each example comes with the code to implement it and screenshots of both how the same functionality looks in the Digital Ocean control panel and the output of their script.

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-the-digital-ocean-api-to-manage-cloud-instances–cms-22864
PHPDeveloper.org

Phillip Shipley: Creating a PHP Nexmo API Client using Guzzle Web Service Client – Part 2

Phillip Shipley has posted the second part of his series (first part is here) about creating a PHP client for the Nexmo API with Guzzle, the popular PHP HTTP client.

In Part 1 of this series we laid a foundation for consuming the Nexmo SMS API and covered a few ways to interact with it. In this part we’ll create the actual Guzzle Web Service Client to interact with it to demonstrate how simple it can be.

He starts by getting Guzzle installed via Composer including a few extra components: guzzle-services, retry-subscriber and log-subscriber. He defines the structure (code) for the message to send to the Nexmo service. Next up is the creation of the actual client that takes in configuration settings and extracts the HTTP location and applies the provided credentials to the connection. Finally he makes a simple SMS client that extends this base client and puts it to use with a simple message defined in an array (to, from and text contents). The client then reports back the results in a simple nested array with response information from the Nexmo API.

Link: http://www.phillipshipley.com/2015/04/creating-a-php-nexmo-api-client-using-guzzle-web-service-client-part-2/
PHPDeveloper.org