Laravel News: How to use WordPress as a backend for a Laravel Application

The Laravel News site has posted an interesting tutorial where they describe the use of WordPress as a backend for a Laravel application. This setup is based on the Laravel News‘ own experience with it in the recent refactoring of the site.

Last week I relaunched Laravel News, and the new site is running on Laravel with WordPress as the backend. I’ve been using WordPress for the past two years, and I’ve grown to enjoy the features that it provides. The publishing experience, the media manager, the mobile app, and Jetpack for tracking stats.

I wasn’t ready to give these features up, and I didn’t have the time to build my own system, so I decided to keep WordPress and just use an API plugin to pull all the content I needed out, then store it in my Laravel application. In this tutorial, I wanted to outline how I set it all up.

While he did find other methods for linking the two, they didn’t quite fit with what he wanted so he worked up his own. The content is then synced via a recurring task pulling over posts, categories and tags. He gets into the WordPress REST API first, showing the extraction of the posts from the API and pushing them into a Laravel collection. There’s also an example of how to sync a post with the database (API) and how to create a new post in a similar way. Also included is the code to get the featured image, get the category for a post and sync the tag values. The tutorial finishes with the code for the sync command and pushing it into the scheduler.

PHPDeveloper.org

Matt Stauffer: Introducing Laravel Echo: An In-Depth Walk-Through

Matt Stauffer has a new post to his site where he’s put together an in-depth look at Laravel Echo, a feature included in newer versions of the framework that makes it easy to integrate websockets into your Laravel-based application.

A few weeks ago, Taylor Otwell introduced another branded product within the Laravel line: Laravel Echo. So far, the only coverage it’s gotten has been his Laracasts video intro, but I recently wrote it up for my book and wanted to share that with you. What follows is an excerpt from Laravel: Up and Running, heavily modified to make sense in a blog format.

He then gets into what Echo is and the different pieces that make it up: updates to the Laravel broadcast system and a new Javascript package. He suggests some places where using Echo makes sense and how to set up a simple broadcast event in your application (non-Echo to start). This makes use of the Pusher service for real-time event broadcasting. With that in place, he helps you install the Echo dependencies and integrating messages from both public and private channels. He also includes a bit of code at the end to exclude the message from broadcasting to the current user if you ever find a need for it.

PHPDeveloper.org

Laravel News Podcast: Episode #17 – Laravel Echo, Laravel Valet, and PHP-FIG implosion

The Laravel News site has posted the latest episode of their podcast covering Laravel Echo, Valet and the PHP-FIG "implosion".

In this twenty-two minute episode, we talk about Laravel Echo and new changes to Laravel Valet.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 of the show for offline listening. If you enjoy the show and want to hear more, be sure to subscribe to their feed and get the latest as they’re released.

PHPDeveloper.org

Scotch.io: Prototype Quickly in Laravel with PHP’s Built-In Server and SQLite

The Scotch.io site has a tutorial they’ve posted showing how to prototype a site quickly using Laravel and its built-in server/SQLite support.

If you are a seasoned Laravel developer, you know the usual project setup drill that involves creating a new project, a fresh database, and adding a virtual host entry to Apache.

If you are starting from scratch, the Apache and MySQL installation can take some time and slow things down for you. However, I will show you how you can jump start your Laravel development without Apache and MySQL.

The tutorial shows you how to use the internal PHP server to host the application, run a Laravel site inside it and integrate SQLite as the database. Each section comes with some example code and the commands/configuration you’ll need to make the system work. They also take a "deep dive" into Larvel’s serve command and how it bootstraps the Laravel instance for the PHP built-in server. The post ends with a look at switching back to MySQL and a comparison of SQLite vs MySQL (as well as using SQLite for production).

PHPDeveloper.org

Laravel News Podcast: Episode #13 – Chrome Extension for Tests, Jigsaw, Fixing MySQL Memory & More

The Laravel News Podcast has released their latest episode, Episode #13 hosted by PHP and Laravel community member Eric L. Barnes.

In this episode, we talk about Laravel Exception Reporter, Chrome Bandwidth limiter, Chrome extension to generate Laravel tests, Jigsaw, Helpspot Vault, Fixing MySql Memory, Sparkwatch, and Taxes.

You can listen to this latest episode either using the in-page audio player or by subscribing either through iTunes or their RSS feed.

PHPDeveloper.org

Scotch.io: The Ultimate Guide to Sending Email in Laravel

On the Scotch.io site today there’s a new tutorial giving you the ultimate guide to sending emails in Laravel – from choosing your provider out to sending both text and HTML emails (some with attachments).

Sending emails in web applications has become so essential. Marketing, notifications, newsletters, adverts, etc are some of the reasons why we send emails to our clients. I’d say the majority of websites send automated emails at least via a „Contact us“ form.

Let’s explore the many possible ways to send emails in a Laravel application.

They start off with a brief look at three different services you can set up out of the box with Laravel: Mailgun (for regular sending), Mailtrap (for debugging) and Mandrill (for bulk emails). They show you how to configure each service in Laravel and setting one of them up as the default. The tutorial then gets into sending the actual emails through a simple EmailController::send endpoint. They show the code to set up the Mail. They show examples of what the resulting emails look like and how they show up in the related mail services. There’s also instructions on attaching files, using queues to optimize email sending and a "bonus" about sending bulk emails with MailChimp.

PHPDeveloper.org

Laravel News: Laracon US Schedule Announced

The Laravel News site has a new post today sharing the full schedule announcement for this year’s Laracon conference (happing in Louisville, Kentucky July 27th through the 29th).

Laracon just announced the preliminary schedule for this year’s conference. Just as in the past, it leaves ample time for hanging out and meeting others interested in the framework.

Sessions for this year’s conference include:

  • "Test Driven Laravel" (Adam Wathan)
  • "Servers For Hackers" (Chris Fidao)
  • "PHP 7" (Zeev Suraski)
  • "Tests Should Tell A Story" (Matthew Machuga)
  • "YAGNI With Laravel" (Jason McCreary)
  • "Lumen, Guzzle, & Swagger" (Jeremy Lindblom)

You can find more information about the conference and pick up tickets from the main conference website. There are discounts available for groups of 3 or more too.

PHPDeveloper.org

Laravel News: Laravel: Up and Running Available for Preorder

If you’re interested in the Laravel framework and possibly using it for your upcoming projects but aren’t sure where to start, you should consider checking out Matt Stauffer’s upcoming O’Reilly book "Laravel: Up and Running". According to this post on the Laravel News site the book is now available for pre-order.

Matt Stauffer has been writing a new book on Laravel named Laravel: Up and Running: A Framework for Building Modern PHP Apps and it’s published by O’Reilly Media. […] This first edition is 250 pages and will come in either paperback or ebook form, but this current preorder is only available in paperback. Based on Amazon the expected shipping date is August 25, 2016.

The book walks you through the creation of a Laravel application from start to finish. it’s no meant as a reference but a "work book" to teach the foundations of the framework. It hopes to provide a single point where developers, especially those familiar with "C-family programming languages", will be able to get started quickly.

PHPDeveloper.org

TutsPlus.com: Test-Driven Development With Laravel & Doctrine

On the TutsPlus.com site they’ve posted a new tutorial showing you how to do test-driven development with Laravel and Doctrine, making use of Doctrine’s own testing functionality inside of a Laravel application for PHPUnit based unit testing.

As a PHP developer, you may use the Test-Driven Development (TDD) technique to develop your software by writing tests. Typically, TDD will divide each task of the development into individual units. A test is then written to ensure that the unit behaves as expected. […] TDD verifies that the code does what you expect it to do. If something goes wrong, there are only a few lines of code to recheck. Mistakes are easy to find and fix. In TDD, the test focuses on the behavior, not the implementation. TDD provides proven code that has been tested, designed, and coded.

[…] PHPUnit is the de-facto standard for unit testing PHP. It’s essentially a framework for writing tests and providing the tools that you will need to run tests and analyze the results. PHPUnit derives its structure and functionality from Kent Beck’s SUnit.

He briefly talks about some of the assertions that PHPUnit has to offer before getting into the support that Laravel includes and how to configure it so Doctrine can work with your database. He then talks about Doctrine, briefly introducing the popular database abstraction tool and how to integrate it with a Laravel application. From there he starts in on the tests themselves, showing code that uses fixture data to create several tests for Post and Comment data.

PHPDeveloper.org

NetTuts.com: What Are Laravel Packages?

On the NetTuts.com site they’ve published a tutorial that explains Laravel packages – what they are and how you can create your own to seamlessly integrate with this popular framework.

As a PHP developer, you may be interested in working with frameworks. Frameworks attempt to make the process of development easier by simplifying common practices used in the majority of developing web projects such as packages, modules, plug-ins, and even components (CakePHP).

[…] There are two types of packages; some are framework independent (stand-alone) and the others are for a specific framework. This tutorial will exclusively cover Laravel packages.

They start with a look at what these packages are and how they integrate with the framework and your application. They also link to a few of the packages they’ve found useful in their development including an IDE helper and OAuth wrapper. With this knowledge in place the tutorial then gets into to creating your own packages, installable via Composer and using a Service Provider to set up configuration needs. The post ends with a look at integrating and enabling your package through the application configuration.

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