Chris Hartjes: Metatesting

Chris Hartjes has a post on his site sharing a video from a presentation he gave about "metatesting" to a local PHP user group:

Yesterday I gave a short talk at GPUG about a topic I’ve dubbed „metatesting“. Borrowing the phrase from a children’s card game I wanted to talk about the state of testing and associated tools.

You can watch the presentation through the in-page video player including both the slides and Chris‘ presentation of them. In it he talks about mature testing tools (and extending them rather than creating new ones), open source projects and their tests or lack thereof, how testing reduces the cost of bugfixing and much more. Check out the full presentation for some great tips and updates on where software (and PHP) testing is today.

PHPDeveloper.org

SitePoint PHP Blog: More Tips for Defensive Programming in PHP

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial continuing on from some previous advice with even more defensive programming practices you can use in your PHP applications.

Many people argue against defensive programming, but this is often because of the types of methods they have seen espoused by some as defensive programming. Defensive programming should not be viewed as a way to avoid test driven development or as a way to simply compensate for failures and move on. […] What are these methods, if not ways to anticipate that your program may fail, and either prevent those, or else ways in which to handle those failures appropriately?

They go on to talk about the ideas of "failing fast" when errors happen in your application with an extra suggestion added on – "fail loud" too. The tutorial then looks at four different places where more defensive programming techniques can be applied (and how):

  • Input validation
  • Preventing Accidental Assignment in Comparisons
  • Dealing with Try/Catch and Exceptions
  • Transactions

They end with a recommendation that, while you should fail fast and loud when issues come up, be sure it’s not to the determent of the overall user experience or sharing messages with users that may just confuse them.

PHPDeveloper.org

Ibuildings Blog: Programming Guidelines – Part 1: Reducing Complexity

On the Ibuildings blog Matthias Noback has kicked off a series that wants to help PHP developers reduce the complexity of their applications. In part one he shares some general tips along with code snippets illustrating the change.

PHP is pretty much a freestyle programming language. It’s dynamic and quite forgiving towards the programmer. As a PHP developer you therefore need a lot of discipline to get your code right. Over the years I’ve read many programming books and discussed code style with many fellow developers. I can’t remember which rules come from which book or person, but this article (and the following ones) reflect what I see as some of the most helpful rules for delivering better code: code that is future-proof, because it can be read and understood quite well. Fellow developers can reason about it with certainty, quickly spot problems, and easily use it in other parts of a code base.

The rest of the article is broken up into several changes you can make to reduce complex code including:

  • Reduce the number of branches in a function body
  • Create small logical units
  • Using single (variable) types
  • Making expressions more readable

He ends this first post in the series with a mention of a few other books to read up on around the subject of "clean" and less complex code.

PHPDeveloper.org

Antonios Pavlakis: Having a go at creating a Behat 3 extension

In this post to his site Antonios Pavlakis "has a go" at creating an extension for the Behat (v3) testing tool. Behat is a testing tool written in PHP that helps with behavior-driven testing as opposed to unit testing with a tool like PHPUnit.

Ever since I got accepted to do a tutorial on Test legacy apps with Behat at the PHPNW15 conference, I’ve been meaning to look into creating custom extensions for Behat. I didn’t have enough time to research into this while preparing for the tutorial, so left it in my todo list in Trello.

During the PHPNW15 long weekend (Friday – Monday), at some point over lunch I was at the table where Matt Brunt (@themattbrunt) and Ciaran McNulty (@ciaranmcnulty) were having a conversation about this and Ciaran said (paraphrasing) “In order to be able to write an extension, you really need to understand how Behat works.”

So a few months later, sleeves up and I went into my vendor/bin/behat and started looking (and poking) around.

After looking in to two current extensions he started to get a feel for what was needed and the pieces that made up an extension. He then gets into detail on each of these pieces and shares some code/configuration he used to create the extension.

PHPDeveloper.org

Zend Developer Zone: Introspecting your Code with Z-Ray for Azure

On the Zend Developer Zone blog Daniel Berman has posted a guide showing how to use their Z-Ray plugin to inspect code running on Azure for statistics around performance, queries and errors thrown by the code.

Quick experimentation, easy collaboration, automated infrastructure and scalability, together with advanced diagnostic and analytical tools – all provide PHP developers with good reasons to develop in the cloud.

[…] The combination of Z-Ray and the Azure cloud means PHP developers building apps on the Azure web app service get the best of both worlds – Z-Ray’s powerful introspection capabilities and Azure’s rich cloud infrastructure.

The post walks you through the steps to create a new Azure-based web application, how to upload your code and enable the Z-Ray feature directly from the Azure "Tools" menu. The Z-Ray toolbar is then automatically injected into your application for your immediate profiling needs.

PHPDeveloper.org

NetTuts.com: WP REST API: Setting Up and Using Basic Authentication

On the NetTuts.com site there’s a tutorial posted showing you how to set up and use basic authentication in the WordPress REST API. This is part two in their series introducing the WordPress REST API.

In the introductory part of this series, we had a quick refresher on REST architecture and how it can help us create better applications. […] In the current part of the series, we will set up a basic authentication protocol on the server to send authenticated requests to perform various tasks through the REST API.

They talk about the methods that are available for authentication and how to configure your server and WordPress instance to use it. From there they show how to make authenticated requests to the API using various tools:

  • Postman
  • a Javascript framework (jQuery)
  • the command line via curl
  • using the WP HTTP API

Example code and screenshots are provided for each (where appropriate) helping to ensure you’re up and working quickly.

PHPDeveloper.org

Michelangelo van Dam: PHP arrays – simple operations

Michelangelo van Dam continues his series on some of the basics of PHP with another look at arrays (started in this article).

Like all things in life, we need to start with simple things. So, in order to understand what arrays are in PHP, we need to take a look at the PHP manual to read what it is all about. […] The thing with PHP is that an array is probably one of the most used data structures in web applications build with PHP and used for a wide variety of purposes.

He covers the basics of:

  • storing multiple values in an array and pushing additional values onto the end
  • removing the last item added to the array
  • pulling the first element off of the array

In his next article, he plans on expanding this introduction to arrays by looking at associative arrays.

PHPDeveloper.org

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.01.2016)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

  • Michael Cullum: #12DaysOfCfpTips – Call for Papers Tips in Tweets
  • Paul Jones: Atlas: a persistence-model data mapper
  • Symfony Finland: Symfony Benchmarks: PHP 5.6, HHVM 3.11 and PHP 7.0.1
  • Rob Allen: Using Composer with shared hosting
  • Sarfraz Ahmed: Coding to Interface
  • Cloudways Blog: Michelangelo Van Dam Digs Deep Into The PHP Community
  • Reddit.com: What is the difference between a framework and a library?
  • Lakion Blog: TDD your API with Symfony and PHPUnit

    PHPDeveloper.org